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Your Questions Answered

See below for some of the questions that we’re frequently asked

  1. Why have I been targeted?
    Either because scammers have “bought” a mailing list with your details on it or you have responded to a tempting letter, phone call or advertisement.
    A great many organisations, businesses and age related charities sell  mailing lists; often advertising those on them as good targets for lotteries/ sweepstakes /catalogues or good charity donators.
  2. Will registering with the Mail Preference Service (MPS) stop me from getting scam mail?
    No. Registering with the MPS will only reduce junk mail. Junk mail is the name given to legitimate mail which promotes goods and services. Junk mail is sometimes seen as a nuisance but it is not the same as “Scam” mail.
  3. Why can’t the MPS stop scam mail?
    Because they can’t stop mail addressed to an individual by name. The Royal Mail has a legal obligation to deliver all addressed mail.
  4. What tricks do the scammers use?
    Scammers are very crafty. They know how to dazzle minds and shut down the normal thought process. Someone whose mind has been dazzled will become excited and start to focus on the prize rather than the fact that they are being asked to send cash to claim it.
    Here are just a few of the dazzling words and statements scammers use:
    Congratulations, Won The Lottery, Guaranteed Winner, Highly Confidential, Unclaimed Prize/ Award, Sworn to Secrecy, Time Sensitive Document.
    Once scammers have dazzled and hooked their victims, they trap them in a never ending cycle of letters and payments by asking for taxes, release fees, administration charges and anything else they can think of to keep the victim sending cash.
    To make the scams more convincing scammers often ask the victim how they would like the non-existent payment to be made e.g. Cash, Cheque or Money transfer?
  5. What other tricks do scammers use?
    Scammers send out false testimonials and photographs of fictitious winners. They claim to be lottery officials, presidents of banks, solicitors, clairvoyants and use other important sounding titles and names.
    Scammers sometimes disguise their mailbox addresses by calling them things like suites, units or apartments to create the illusion they are operating from a traceable office or grand building.
    Scammers try to trick people into sending them passports, photographs and birth certificates and pretend they are arranging celebration parties or sending out photographers.
  6. What is a chronic victim?
    A chronic scam mail victim is the name given to someone who repeatedly falls for scams. This could be because they are over trusting, socially isolated or suffering from a mental incapacity such as age related declining mental health or dementia.
    Chronic victims refuse to believe they are being scammed and spend most of their time reading sorting and replying to scams.
    The scam mail knits together and forms a delusional world that becomes a victim’s reality. This type of  victim will shun all help and advice. Sometimes clairvoyant scammers turn the victim against their families. 
    These victims are becoming known as having Jessica’s Scam Syndrome (JSS)
  7. Where does scam mail come from?
    Scam mail can come from anywhere in the world.
lloyds tsb
lloyds tsb
Trading Standards Institute
Trading Standards Institute
actionfraud
actionfraud
national crime agency
national crime agency
NTS Scam Team Logo
NTS Scam Team Logo
Check a Trade
Check a Trade
dma
dma
ico
ico
truecall
truecall
homeinstead
homeinstead
johnhollandsales
johnhollandsales