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The Campaign

In 2007 Jessica’s daughter Marilyn Baldwin appeared on BBC Breakfast in an attempt to shock the government and postal services into taking action to protect millions of vulnerable people who were sending billions of pounds to fraudsters. She spoke about the victims Think Jessica had been alerted to, some  were receiving up to 100 scam letters a day from criminals all over the world.
She appealed to the Royal Mail to put a system in place allowing postal workers to  flag up victims by passing on their details to professionals who could help.
After years of constant appeals Marilyn’s persistence finally paid off when in 2014 the Royal Mail and Trading Standards started working together to train postal workers.
However by the time many victims are flagged up they already have Jessica’s Scam Syndrome – Think Jessica continues to campaign for protection for those victims.

The Think Jessica campaign team are contacted by numerous individuals and organisations to help with severe cases of scam mail.

  • Relatives of victims
  • Postmen/woman
  • Trading Standards
  • Citizens Advice
  • Age Concern
  • Help the Aged
  • MenCap
  • Memory Clinics
  • Banks/Building Societies

All the parties above have reported cases of victims who are emptying bank accounts to keep up with the demands of criminals who befriend, trick & threaten them daily.

The campaign has a number of common sense objectives.

Firstly:
To raise the public’s awareness and educate professionals to the extent of the criminal mail problem in the U.K. £10 billion is estimated as being lost to scams each year; however, only one in five cases are reported.

Secondly:
“Jessica Scam Syndrome” to be recognised as a condition and those effected separated from criminals. (Currently there is no help available from any agency or organisation other than “lip service”). As the law stands any intervention like redirection of mail or handing over power of attorney is not possible without the victim’s consent.

The Fraud Act 2006 3 May 2007 – Malcolm Woolgar – Lloyd’s
The UK Fraud Act 2006 (”the Act”) came into force on 15 January 2007. The Act is a clearly written piece of legislation that should facilitate the investigation and prosecution of fraud in the UK. The following provides a brief summary of the key aspects of this legislation.

According to the Act, the offence of fraud can be committed in three ways:

  • False representation (section 2)
  • Failing to disclose information (section 3)
  • Abuse of position (section 4)

It is no longer necessary to prove that the victim was deceived: all that is required is to prove that the fraudster was dishonest in their behaviour.

lloyds tsb
lloyds tsb
Trading Standards Institute
Trading Standards Institute
actionfraud
actionfraud
national crime agency
national crime agency
NTS Scam Team Logo
NTS Scam Team Logo
Check a Trade
Check a Trade
dma
dma
ico
ico
truecall
truecall
homeinstead
homeinstead
johnhollandsales
johnhollandsales